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Why Does Rockstar Games Care So Much?

Dec 21, 12 Why Does Rockstar Games Care So Much?

We’ll ignore the accolades for their best selling free roamers Red Dead Redemption and L.A. Noire and focus on the passion of possibly the greatest video game developer in contemporary society.

They’ve been here since the beginning of my childhood, which sits comfortably and clearly at twelve years ago, back in the late nineties. As a child, playing any Rockstar game was nothing short of attractive and mind-boggling fun. From the very beginning, you couldn’t help but feel absolutely drenched in the culture of Liberty City.

It was a world that didn’t beg you to explore it, but rather it showed you how badly it made fun of itself. GTA didn’t care much about what you thought of its stereotypes. In fact, it supported your stereotypes and made you believe that they were true! The dark humor was just a curtain of truth that hadn’t bothered to dive into the specifics of its origin. When you think about it, that’s probably the best way to reel in an audience of teenagers and thirty year old men to play a game indefinitely.

The best part about it? No sketchy motives and actions were needed to be taken in order for people to actually buy their game. No one needed to be tricked into knowing why they should pick up the next copy of Vice City; the reason was imprinted right there on the game case!

This was a passion that the creators and the consumers really connected on. The classic “You make it, I play it” relationship. And it wasn’t just GTA, as Max Payne and the Red Dead series followed closely behind, all part of Rockstar’s mission to provide new and improved experiences to people who desired high octane shooters and beautifully crafted free roams. But why?

Because these guys, whether you believe it or not, care only about making video games.

If there’s no passion in the industry, then Rockstar simply ceases to bother with their creations. Just recently, Rockstar had an interview with IGN regarding their future endeavors. Neslie Benzies says that eventually they’d like to fuse all cities from the GTA lore into one super packed game! Can you imagine? Obviously, such a technical feat is far ahead in the future, and we can only imagine it coming five to ten years in the future. But with luck and some ballsy action from Microsoft, the next generations of HD consoles may possibly be able to handle the power of such a game.

Of course, the PC platform is ripe for the taking.

What you really should respect is the fact that we always reach the point of desperation in the next entry in their series. We’ve all been dying for a new entry into GTA since 2011. Do the math and that’s twenty years in dog calculating. Their tendency to resist immortalizing the annual sales of their games is rooted in the fact that they don’t want to ruin the respect of their series, in light of their fans.

Ya hear that?

Respect.

It’s clear from viewing the actions of Treyarch and Activision that respect really isn’t necessary in video game sales when you break the 1 billion barrier on every consecutive, yearly release of Call of Duty.

No concern for respect.

Go figure.

You can rest assured that Rockstar Games are the guys that you want to have your chips invested in when the next generation of consoles lands on the market in the coming years.

Image Credit: Rockstar Games

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About 

Whether it be in front of the big screen melting faces in Gears of War, or scrolling endless amounts of pages on the next graphics card for his PC-Derrick makes it his business to keep his mind buried in Computer Nerd culture. Hailing from Houston, Texas-his hobbies include PC building, web mastering, video games, swimming and the occasional sling of the string with a bow and arrow.

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