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The iPhone ‘Sexting’ App: The Stupidest App On A Smartphone Yet

Dec 03, 12 The iPhone ‘Sexting’ App: The Stupidest App On A Smartphone Yet

It’s called Snapchat, and it’s a messaging app that allows users to send images back and forth, but there’s a catch that makes this app uniquely questionable. Why not just send pictures via text right? Well, what if for some strange reason you don’t want said photos to get leaked.

Enter Snapchat.

The thing that makes this app so unique is the same thing that makes it questionable. The photos that are sent have a limit on how long they can be viewed. The sender can actually choose how long they’re viewable on the receiver’s phone before, POOF-they’re gone forever!

“Forever” is a relative term though, just ask anyone who’s been divorced.

Now what’s the big fuss, you may be wondering? The big fuss is that the app is marketed to teens, and we’ve all been teenagers before. We know the sexual desires that constantly pop-up in the minds of teenagers.

The app store has listed, “Rated 12+ for the following: Infrequent/Mild Mature/Suggestive Themes, Infrequent/Mild Sexual Content or Nudity, Infrequent/Mild Profanity or Crude Humor, Infrequent/Mild Alcohol, Tobacco, or Drug Use or References” along the left side of the browser as a disclaimer to users.

To the contrary, Snapshot has this on their FAQ page, “Do you look at my pictures? —Nope! We can’t see any of the photos sent through the service. Each photo is deleted after the recipient opens it.”

I’m just gonna come out and say it. How the hell can they put a disclaimer making claims of adult content if they can’t view the photos being sent?

Common sense, that’s how.

People have been sending pictures of their genitals back and forth over the net since its birth. Now that it’s faster, more accessible, and more conveniently in our pockets at all times, what makes anyone think that’s going to change?

The simple fact that the app is marketed to a crowd of 12+ should raise eyebrows. Children of that age are not responsible enough to understand the weight of their actions in this ever-so-connected world. Yeah, the image self-destructs, POOF, but what about screenshots? If the receiver takes a screenshot before the allotted time has expired, who’s to say they won’t put it on blast on Twitter, Facebook, Tumbler, or wherever.

As a designer I can’t help but break down their logo, site, and overall brand. It’s obviously aimed at children. Color Psychology shows that yellows are attention getting, and pinks are youthful and energetic. Their logo/mascot is a cutesy looking little ghost with its tongue out, for Christ’s sake! How much more obvious could the design be?

It’s obviously aimed at youth, and it’s obviously used for transmitting inappropriate photos. Otherwise, why would they need to disappear?

In response to these concerns, Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel stated, “I just don’t know people who do that. It doesn’t seem that fun when you can have real sex.”

What a CLOWN. Seriously, dude? He must live in a box, because I don’t believe for one second that someone who was bright enough to successfully pioneer a project like this can be that stupid.

Yeah, that may be a decent argument for grown folks, but not for the teens that the app is marketed too. Hiding behind warped logic like that must be this guy’s way of capitalizing on the sexual tension of teens and still being able to sleep at night.

Of course that makes sense for adults because, let’s face it-even without being married first, plenty of adults have consensual sex; while it’s not of the highest morals, it is legal after all.

That’s not the case for a 13-year-old girl who thinks she’s in love or she just wants to be edgy and rebellious. She knows her dad would send her to boarding school if he found out she was sexually active, so she seeks the next best thing, sexting. Enter Snapchat once more.

Although I believe Evan Spiegel is a real pig for trying to pass this off as an innocent and fun way of keeping in touch, the responsibility truly lies on the parents.

Your teen probably shouldn’t have their own smartphone, and if they do, you should probably be doing random checks on it like a blood-thirsty drill instructor in a Marine boot camp.

While I’m sure there are plenty of users who are using the app innocently, something tells me that they’re the exception and not the rule.

Image Credit: Lisa F. Young / Shutterstock

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