Quantcast

Is Android Better For Porn?

Jan 28, 13 Is Android Better For Porn?

The new video-sharing app Vine was the subject of considerable Internet banter yesterday when several news outlets reported how easily discoverable adult content was by using the hashtag #porn.

It sparked a tremendous amount of discussion on Twitter (which built Vine) and other social media outlets about if this would run afoul of Apple’s App Store policies. The reason? Apple pulled the popular photo-sharing app 500px last week due to the supposed ease with which users could find nude images. The app is still unavailable with 500px developers scrambling to appease the App Store overlords.

However, 500px can still be found on Android. There is no approval process for submitting apps to Google Play. Apps can be removed if they violate the store’s policies, but mostly this involves piracy and malware.

Google Play has a much larger amount of racier applications for those who want to find them. It was one of Steve Jobs’s major lines of attack against Android when the platform war began heating up. He felt Apple had a “moral obligation” to keep porn out of the App Store.

Apple has largely done so, but many developers continue to complain that its application of App Store policies is highly inconsistent, with this being a prime example. If one can quite easily find adult material by performing a simple hashtag search in an app like Vine or Twitter, what makes 500px or other apps any different?

It is a good question, one which Apple has not been able to satisfactorily answer. Lewd material is going to exist on any social platform. And considering the iPad has a web browser, pretty much anything is fair game for those who want it.

Yet parents also want and deserve smart controls for keeping some sense of innocence for their children. This is where Google needs to build some more family-friendly features into Android. It’s great for us geeks who want no limits, but there are parents who genuinely want to let their kids use these devices without them stumbling onto the wrong kind of video.
Google’s app policy is superior for those who want the maximum freedom on a mobile platform. But wanting to apply some level of filtering is not censorship, it is what a civil society expects from a company that sanctions software.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Email
Follow redOrbit on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest.