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Introducing Kubi: The Revolving Robot

Dec 10, 12 Introducing Kubi: The Revolving Robot

New strange advances in rotary technology have given birth to one of the most awkward and somehow ergonomically pleasing screen displays in the market.

Meet Kubi – our next innovation for motion-controlled screen displays at a reasonable price (that won’t stab you in your wallet). Kubi is a cutesy little fella, more generic than the Romo 1 – and for that genuine fun factor, Kubi is priced at a convenient $250.

Its features aren’t anything to gawk at, either. Motion in robots is a very expensive factor, which is more than likely the reasoning behind there being less advances in walking, talking robots. So when the boys and girls at Revolve Robotics layed down the blueprint work for its design, they understood the pros and cons of building a moving robot. Their polls brought them to theorize that simply having a robot move uncontrolled and in areas that you didn’t intend is not only an invasion of potential privacy, it’s also a little creepy.

Good move, Revolve.

Not to mention that, as stated before, walking robots are expensive.

So what’s the next best thing?

Well, they would give full freedom of motion to a stationary turret. Picture it: You slide your iPad into a slot and from there on, whether it be in the kitchen or in the living room, the screen will follow you around in full 3-D space for your convenience.

Sounds a bit useless to me.

If you have the money, then by all means try to make an argument for it – but if I were the guys in charge of the company, it would be back to the drawing board for a new design. I can’t speak in place of actual computer robotic technicians though.

Or can I?

As a consumer, I have been sucked into the socioeconomic norm of ‘Feeling’ out every product that I come in contact with. Ergonomics play a huge roll in computer technology like that – even a chair that is being crafted needs a considerable amount of thinking before its manufacturing gets underway. If it’s not aesthetically pleasing, then the consumer simply won’t be comfortable with it. The technology of today is designed specifically with that factor in mind, so if I don’t like the idea of a screen following me around my room, then I don’t see how it will be pleasing for the consumer.

The phenomenon that I can’t get over is how exactly is it that the creator of these products can’t look past their busy schedules and endless mountains of used 5 Hour Energy Drinks to think about this. I much prefer the Romo 1 to the Kubi – and it’s not because it’s a moving robot.

Well, yes – it being a moving robot is a factor in my selection of it, but it’s really just the fact that it’s cute. If you’re going to follow me around the room, then you better at least be cute.

Ain’t that the way that being followed works?

Women don’t like the stalkers that ain’t cute.

I’m at a loss for words, let me know what ya think in the comments!!!

Image Credit: Revolve Robotics

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  • Anonymous

    I can definitely see where you are coming from – there are a tonn of useless “gadgets” coming out – some trinket to solve any small problem with tech. Here’s where we are coming from: I spend a lot of time on Skype both for work and for family (most of our family is on the east coast while I’m in SF). There have been countless hours where my relatives Skyped with my wife and our 14mo old daughter – ever try to keep a webcam trained on a toddler? Or participate in a meeting from a speakerphone? The Romo is cool but its a toy – my daughter kicks it, and I sure wouldn’t want it represent me remotely in a conference room. I don’t want my remote self to be cute, I don’t want it to be creepy, I want it to be me! The tablet shows your face full size, you can look around, people feel like they’re actually talking to you. Let me know if you wanna try it.

    • http://www.hardlightmedia.com John Valenzano

      Got one to send us so we can review it? Sure!