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About John Millis

John P. Millis, Ph.D., is professor of physics and astronomy at Anderson University, in Anderson Indiana. He teaches a wide variety of courses while maintaining an active research program in high energy astrophysics.

His research focus is on pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, and supernova remnants. Using the VERITAS gamma-ray observatory in southern Arizona, he studies the very high energy radiation from these dynamic sources to extract information about their formation and emission mechanisms. Dr. John received his B.S. in physics at Purdue University and remained there for the completion of his Ph.D., where he focused on High Energy Astrophysics. When not teaching or writing about physics and space, Dr. John enjoys spending time with his family, tickling the keys on his piano and playing a wide variety of sports.

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Here are my most recent posts:

Experiment Sets New Constraints On Dark Matter

Mar 06, 14 Experiment Sets New Constraints On Dark Matter

Posted by in Armchair Astronaut, Space

The search for dark matter is one of the most compelling areas of research in astronomy today. Recent experiments – such as the Fermi Gamma-ray Telescope and Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer – have seen hints of dark matter annihilations, but we have yet to identify the particle itself yet.

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The Hazards Of Traveling To Mars

Nov 21, 13 The Hazards Of Traveling To Mars

Posted by in Armchair Astronaut, Space

There are a number of well-documented challenges that NASA must over come if we are to make such a manned Mars mission a reality. But perhaps the greatest danger facing astronauts is the radiation that they would be exposed to as they hurtled across the solar system.

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Understanding The Universe

Nov 20, 13 Understanding The Universe

Posted by in Armchair Astronaut, Space

How did our Universe begin? A century ago the answer to that question would have looked much different than our modern understanding. And, predictably, our knowledge of the Cosmos will almost certainly change over the next hundred years.

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Powering A Mission To Mars

Nov 14, 13 Powering A Mission To Mars

Posted by in Armchair Astronaut, Space

In the 1960s, the country was united in a vision: We would land astronauts on the surface of the Moon by the end of the decade. Based on what we knew about space travel at that moment, President Kennedy’s words seemed to set an impossible goal.

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Using Gamma-Ray Astronomy To Find Cancer

Oct 17, 13 Using Gamma-Ray Astronomy To Find Cancer

Posted by in Armchair Astronaut, Health

My primary field of research is in very high-energy astrophysics, specifically using gamma-ray telescopes to study exotic objects in the Universe, such as neutron stars and black holes. But an emerging medical field, led by Dr. Deborah Rhodes and others, is relying on developments made by physicists with no medical training at all.

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Do Black Holes Have Hair?

Oct 03, 13 Do Black Holes Have Hair?

Posted by in Armchair Astronaut, Space

Black holes are fascinating beasts. Not only do they maintain densities that we can’t possibly simulate on Earth, (meaning we have no way to accurately probe the physics that governs the internal dynamics of black holes) but they possess characteristics that make them nearly impossible to distinguish from one another. Or so we think.

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Happy Birthday NASA, Take The Day Off!

Oct 02, 13 Happy Birthday NASA, Take The Day Off!

Posted by in Armchair Astronaut, Space

Most of us would enjoy being able to take a day (or more) off to celebrate our birthdays. However, I don’t think this is what NASA had in mind. The federal agency that sent men to the moon, that revealed the deepest secrets of the Universe, and is paving the way for colonies on other worlds, turned 55 years old yesterday.

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Fighting Fire In Zero Gravity

Sep 15, 13 Fighting Fire In Zero Gravity

Posted by in Armchair Astronaut, Space

One of the most dangerous aspects of manned space flight is the threat of fire. Orbiting hundreds of miles above the Earth it is not possible to “leave the building,” so to speak, unless one completely abandons the orbital vehicle.

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Hunting Cosmic Rays

Sep 07, 13 Hunting Cosmic Rays

Posted by in Armchair Astronaut, Space

In an experiment, the impact of which would not be fully grasped for decades, the Austrian-American physicist Victor Hess launched a particle detector upon a balloon.

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Meet The World’s Most Overpaid Teacher

Sep 02, 13 Meet The World’s Most Overpaid Teacher

Posted by in Education

There always seems to be contentious debate about the level of teacher’s salaries in this country. At the heart of it always seems to be the effectiveness of teachers compared to their incomes. Instead of outlining some grand plan, I instead offer the case of one teacher who has been walking a different path.

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