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A Scary Story Of Scion (Part 2)

Oct 12, 13 A Scary Story Of Scion (Part 2)

Be sure to read Part 1.

Hearing a sudden racket from somewhere, a man awoke from a rather non-restful sleep. Looking around, he did not recognize his surroundings. When he last knew, he was sitting in his office, grading papers. An engineering professor, and unknowingly a scion of Hephaestus, Greek god of the forge, he now found himself in what looked to be an automotive shop with some large, scary-looking Hispanic fellow pounding his fist on the door. Moving over to the door, but not opening it for the stranger, the scion of Hephaestus asked who they were and what was going on in very broken English. Not what they were hoping to find, the scions of Athena and Huitzilopochtli asked the man if he knew where they were, which the man did not. Rather than finding answers, they had found only more questions.

Not far from where this was happening, in a small hotel, a special agent from the C.I.A. awoke in a bed, finding himself not in the same room he had gone to sleep in. This agent, also unknowingly the scion of Heimdall, watcher of the Norse gods, quickly checked himself over for any signs of having been drugged or knocked unconscious. Not finding any, he quickly came to believe that this was some sort of training exercise. Taking stock of what he had, his sidearm, his cellphone (which was unable to get any signal) and his wallet, which is what he had when he had stretched out on his hotel room bed back in Southern California. He checked the nightstand for a Bible, finding that it had a tag on its cover for the Motel 6 of Hawthorn, Washington. Heading outside, and finding it to be so foggy that he could hardly see more than a few dozen feet ahead of him, he headed out to see if he could find any clue as to what was going on.

Meanwhile, the befuddled scions of Huitzilopochtli, Athena, and Hephaestus had decided to stick together, as there was little else they could do. The scion of Hephaestus was somewhat nervous of the scion of Huitzilopochtli, as any sane man would be, but the scion of Athena managed to earn his trust, at least for the time being. As they were heading down the street, looking for anyone else, they spotted a small Japanese girl, dressed like a J-Pop idol. This girl had just woken up in the backseat of a car. The last thing she remembered, she had just finished up a show over in Tokyo, Japan, her hometown. Like them, she was also unknowingly a scion, her mother being Amaterasu, goddess of the sun and of the universe itself. When she noticed the three of them approaching her, she was immediately on edge, thinking she might have been kidnapped or something. This changed to confusion as she saw that they were not Japanese and heard them speaking English, which she fortunately understood. As they introduced themselves and began asking one another, once more, if anyone knew what was going on or where they were, another man approached them ā€“ the scion of Heimdall ā€“ and told them that they were in Hawthorn, Washington.

This made no sense, as the scions of Huitzilopochtli and Athena had been in Nevada, the scion of Amaterasu in Tokyo, and the others in California. None of them had any signal for their phones, nor could they get any payphones to work. The young scion of Amaterasu noticed a gas station and headed that way, despite it being closed and with no one inside. Grabbing a map, she quickly began looking over it for where exactly Hawthorn, WA was so that they could, if needed, make their way to the closest town.

Unfortunately, Hawthorn, WA was not anywhere on the map.

To be continued…

Image Credit: White Wolf Publishing

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About 

Joshua is a freelance writer, aspiring novelist, and avid table-top gamer who has been in love with the hobby ever since it was first introduced to him by a friend in 1996. Currently he acts as the Gamemaster in three separate games and is also a player in a fourth. When he is not busy rolling dice to save the world or destroying the hopes and dreams of his players, he is usually found either with his nose in a book or working on his own. He has degrees in English, Creative Writing, and Economics.