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A Look At The Fluff Of Changeling: The Lost

Apr 13, 14 A Look At The Fluff Of Changeling: The Lost

Imagine for a moment that you are going about your everyday life when all of a sudden, you find yourself lost in a thick, thorny bramble maze. You do not know how you got there. You could have been walking through the woods, down an alley next to a pub, or even just walking your dog down the street in front of your house that you have walked down every day for the past several years. You are alone, lost, and afraid. Then, something comes to you. Something strange and inhuman. Possibly monstrous, possibly beautiful, it does not matter for you fall helpless before it. This creature, a True Fey, takes you further into the Hedge and to their realm where they mold you and sculpt you into something not quite human to suit their needs. Maybe they wanted a slave, maybe a scribe to jot down all of their maddening babble. Maybe they just wanted a pet? Either way you are trapped, but not forever. You see an escape, an opening, a chance, and you take it. You rush back into the Hedge and fight your way through with the howls of the Wyld Hunt echoing behind you. You run and you run and you run and finally, you make your way back into the human world. You are free.

But what that creature has done to you, that remains. Or does it? No one seems to notice that you have the features of a cat or stand more than eight feet tall. You glance at yourself in a mirror and see the monster you have become, but only just. It takes a bit, but you are able to discern your own Glamour. Whatever was done to you hides itself from the eyes of others. Quickly, you try and return to your life, to your loved one’s and friends, only to find that you have never left. You are still with them, only it is not you. It is a Fetch, a creature of twigs and leaves and vine that was given life by the magics of the Fey, but only you can see it. To the others, it is the person you used to be. It is you, and you are not. You have escaped your captivity only to return to a world in which you do not belong.

This is the setting of Changeling: The Lost, a dark fairy tale about loneliness and a wanting to belong. This is a game that focuses on character, on what it means to be human as well as what it means to be more or less than human. The Changelings, they have no greater purpose. No ultimate goal. No great quest save for what they take upon themselves. Their only real goal is to survive and to remain free from the confines of the Wyld Hunt, for going back into that Fey realm is a fate many would consider far worse than death, especially if the god-like True Fey are angry at you for defying them, and given the cruelty and ruthlessness of the Wyld Hunt, that is easily presumed.

Unlike some other World of Darkness games, Changeling: The Lost encourages players to work together and even be kind towards one another out of a sense of camaraderie. Vampires form coteries to survive, though they still remain mostly self-interested. Werewolves form packs because it is in their nature to do so. Mages form circles so that they might reach levels of greater power. Changelings, on the other hand, come together because they are all that they have. They are alone otherwise, and alone they cannot survive. Even the changeling courts, with all their scheming and rivalries, work together towards that common goal of keeping the freedom they have all worked so hard to gain. In many ways, I find the changelings to be the most human and relatable of all the various World of Darkness games.

As always, thanks for reading and I wish you all good gaming.

Image Credit: White Wolf Publishing

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About 

Joshua is a freelance writer, aspiring novelist, and avid table-top gamer who has been in love with the hobby ever since it was first introduced to him by a friend in 1996. Currently he acts as the Gamemaster in three separate games and is also a player in a fourth. When he is not busy rolling dice to save the world or destroying the hopes and dreams of his players, he is usually found either with his nose in a book or working on his own. He has degrees in English, Creative Writing, and Economics.